5 things to do in Tampere

Tampere is physically shaped by two lakes and culturally by the hydro power they brought to the city. Here’s 5 things you’ll want to do in modern Tampere.

Tampere is not only physically shaped by two lakes, Näsijärvi and Pyhäjärvi but also by the hydro power the rapids between them enabled. The ability to generate electricity drove Tampere to become the industrial center of Finland, and the large number of factories and working class propelled the city to the center of Finland’s bloody civil war in 1918.

In modern times, Tampere is famous for it’s cultural and historical activities- theatre, museums and music. Here are five things you’ll want to do if you visit this city.

 

1. Theatres

There’s a large range of theatres on offer, with some of the most popular including the Worker’s Theatre, the Tampere Theatre and the open-air Pyynikki Summer Theatre with a revolving auditorium. In August there’s even an international theatre festival.

2. Museums

There’s also a bunch of museums to visit, with many showcasing the rich history of the region. I loved the Museum Milavida – a restored 19th century mansion and the  Vapriikki Museum which is housed in a huge old factory building and actually contains many smaller museums. There’s one on natural history, minerals, the best nature photographs of the year, Tampere through the ages, computer games, Finnish sports, and even Dracula/Vampires.

3. Try Local Food

The old market hall is the perfect spot to stop for a coffee and pulla (Finnish pastry) at a traditional cafe, and sample some of the local specialties like black pudding sausage. One of the most delicious things I tasted in Tampere translates to “Poor Knights”. It’s basically French Toast made out of day old pulla and served with whipped cream and homemade jam- yum!

4. The Stable Yards: handicraft & chocolate stores

Just below the Milavida Museum you’ll find a cluster of small stores in historic wooden houses and stables. By far my favourite was the Tallipihi’s Chocolate Shop. Around Christmas time there’s also an outdoor market in the area.

5. Amusement Park by the Lake

The popular Särkänniemi amusement park not only boasts a bunch of rides, but also stunning views as it’s perched above the Näsijärvi lake.

 

 

 

Finnish Island life: a few days spent on Vänö

In the Turku Archipelago, a group of over 20,000 islands scattered off the south-west corner of Finland, you’ll find Vänö, a tiny island where life slows down and nature is paramount. Reached by a one hour ferry from the harbour town of Kasnäs, the island is the perfect escape to the simple pleasures of life.

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The island’s regular population of 12 swells to several hundred visitors during the summer months when day visitors drop into the island for swimming and hiking and owners of summer cottages come to stay for weeks.

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Like many Finnish cottage experiences, the traditional cottage we stayed in was all about getting back to basics and appreciating nature. With no running water, only an outdoor long drop loo and a shower by the sea (with sauna of course), the best way to wash each day was by a swim in the Baltic sea. Sunning yourself on one of the many flats rocks afterwards is the preferred way of drying off.

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The island is small enough to explore on foot but bikes are a welcome way of getting to the only sandy beach in summer. There’s a nature reserve with a clearly marked path and signs along the way to point out areas of interest. There’s also a peaceful chapel, built by a Rotary volunteer project in the 1970s near 17th century ruins, although the original chapel may have been built on the island as early as the 12th century.

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During summer there’s also a small shop by the harbour, with essential food supplies, a little cafe and even one beer tap. There’s also a tiny thrift shop, complete with a rack of second hand clothes, and of course there’s a place for recycling, in true Finnish environmentally friendly style.

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Practicalities

Getting There: A bus from Helsinki or Turku to Kasnas takes around 2 or 3.5 hours, respectively and in peak summer the fare was €25 and €35 pp. From there, it’s a free 1 hour ferry trip to the island.

Getting Around: Walking or bike

Cost: For our basic AirBnB cottage with no running water, outdoor toilet and communal shower we paid €200 for 3 nights. While I think this is quite expensive for what was provided, the experience of staying on such a small island in a traditional setting was well worth the fee. Food on the island is relatively expensive but saves the hassle of bringing much of your own from Turku or Helsinki as the shop in Kasnas is also sparse. Sauna rental is €16 an hour and one free session is included in the AirBnB.

Best time to go: Summer is definitely the best time to visit as the shop is open and the sea is inviting

Length of stay: We stayed for 3 nights and this was the perfect amount of time. However if you stay longer, the free ferries will take you to other islands for day trips.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed hearing about the little island of Vänö- I’d love to hear about your experiences traveling in Finland.

 

A weekend in Turku

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Founded in the 13th century, Turku is the oldest city in Finland and in 1640 was home to Finland’s first university, The Royal Academy of Turku (now the University of Helsinki). While the large student population lends a youthful vibe to the city, most students are on summer holidays in the warmer months when the city really comes alive. The best place to take in Turku’s relaxed atmosphere is along the banks of the Aura river, where trendy cafes and restaurants abound. If you do happen to get to Turku, here are some things I’d recommend doing over a weekend.

 

Friday Night: Dinner by the Aura river

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With the Turku Cathedral in the background and a refreshing evening breeze, dinner by the Aura river is the perfect way to spend your first night in Turku. Some popular options include Pinella– the oldest restaurant in Turku, Smor, and the extremely popular Kaskis (be sure to book a table). For more of a budget dinner, there are market stalls all along the main river area during summer weekends with a range of savoury and sweet options.

 

Saturday: explore the old buildings of Turku

Spend the morning wandering the streets of the old town and river area. Highlights include the central market with local produce and flowers, the temporary weekend food and handicraft market along the river and classy shops and outdoor clothes market in the Old Great Square. During the last weekend of June there is also a traditional medieval market in the Great Square.

 

 

Some of the more beautiful old buildings to explore include the Turku City Library by the river, the Turku Art Museum perched on a hill overlooking the city and of course the 700 year old Turku Cathedral, Turun Tuomiokirkko.

 

 

 

 

From the Cathedral it’s a 10 minute stroll to the 200 year old handicraft cottage museum of Luostarinmaki, which miraculously escaped the fire of 1827 that ravaged Turku. Here you can explore a collection of old small wooden houses, including 30 artisans workshops, such as a silversmith, painting and weaving studio, a printing press and post office. The houses are set amidst tiny lanes and grassy courtyards, full of flowers and garden beds. Entrance is €7 for adults and the museum is open daily from 10am to 6pm.

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Sunday: wander along the Aura & visit Turku’s castle

Turku’s most famous attraction is the castle, Turun Linna, which was founded in 1280 at the mouth of the Aura river. It’s a 45min walk each direction along the river from the Turku Cathedral, so if this is a little much in the summer sun, there are public bikes for rent for €5/day that make for a much faster trip. The fee is paid by credit card directly on the bike and there are numerous spots to pick up and drop off the bikes.

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Public bikes for hire in Turku

 

Entrance to the castle is €10 for adults, €5 for kids and is well worth the fee, as you are able to explore much of the castle and learn fascinating details of the history of the building and surrounding area from the museum and displays. The castle is open 10am- 6pm daily through the summer months of July and August and everyday excluding Monday from September to May.

 

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After working up an appetite exploring the castle, it’s the perfect time to indulge in the Finnish weekend tradition of brunssi brunch! We loved Tiirikkala, a contemporary Nordic-style cafe, located on the river bank near the library. There’s plenty of outdoor seating at the front of the cafe, beautiful decor inside and a wonderful rooftop-terrace. The cafe has various meat, fish and vegetarian brunch menus, all including tea/coffee and desert for €19 pp.

 

 

If you still have energy in the afternoon then wander along the river in the opposite direction of the castle to Padolla– a perfectly picturesque cafe with hammocks, chair swings and stand up paddle boards for hire. The cafe is 3km from the Cathedral and along the way you’ll pass the ruins of the bishop’s palace and Koroinen Cross which marks the site where the pope decreed the bishopric of Finland should move to in 1229.

 

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The Koroinen Cross

 

 

Practicalities

Getting There: Turku is easily accessible by bus or train from Helsinki. The journey takes around 2 hours and will cost roughly €10 for a bus ticket with Onni Bus. The bus station in Turku is a 15 minute walk from the main tourist area by the river.

Getting Around: Once you arrive in Turku it’s easy to get around by walking or renting one of the public bikes, which cost €5 a day (discounted for longer stays).

Cost: Our AirBnB was located near the bus station and a 25min walk from the river. At €130 for 3 nights, the place was cosy and clean. Food and drink is expensive in Finland but there are many cheaper options like the river’side markets.

Best time to go: Summer!

Length of stay: There’s plenty to keep you busy over a weekend and many sites further afield if you have more time to spend around the greater area.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed hearing about Finland’s oldest city, I’d love to hear about your experiences traveling in Finland.